MIDLOTHIAN

The reins of the Midlothian Chamber of Commerce board are now in the hands of Cathy Altman. With her imaginative and enthusiastic approach, she's using her new role as the chairperson to strengthen board members' leadership skills to serve the city more efficiently.

She envisions the chamber helping companies shape Midlothian and build networks while keeping the small town feel. Altman explained the board recently held a workshop to produce a three-year strategic plan.

Concluding the meeting, Altman knew, “We want enthusiasm. I want people who love the chamber and the community, and if we channel all of our efforts, then we can touch a lot of people and have a lot of fun.”

From a leadership perspective, her theory is if Midlothian Chamber President Cammy Jackson and her team continue the enthusiasm, and the board does too, then it will have a ripple effect on business owners wanting to become more involved.

She mentioned the several new faces working with the chamber and how she’s gone through extents to make working with each other efficient. With the dynamic group, Altman said it is “uplifting.”

But she's focused on understanding individual strengths. In doing so, Altman has noticed members grow into new leadership styles.

“In doing that, I believe the board has matured in our governance with the focus of leadership,” Altman relayed.

“We’ve got people who just have a real interest and an ability to teach others. That’s the maturity that’s been fun to see in the past couple of years,” Altman shared.

Altman mentioned she learned how to work with a team approach and a servant leadership heart from former chairperson Keith Nichols. This mentality has board members rolling up their sleeves to get the job done.

She’s taken the time to meet with previous board members, as well as, partner board members with the school, city and county. She’s learning how the board and other Midlothian entities can collaborate.

In her experience, Altman has worked with different groups on collaborative efforts within the city, Midlothian ISD and some that are even in the works.

When reflecting on her previous board memberships, she recalled volunteering for Meals on Wheels, which was her first exposure to working with a collaborative team. She has also been part of the economic development board (4A), the parks board, school growth management and oversight with MISD. She was also on the bond oversight committee when the Courts building and jail were constructed.

“If it’s serving on multiple boards, just bringing different leadership styles from a large range of small and large businesses," Altman elaborated. "Some of them are mom-and-pop shops, and some are solo businesses, some are large industrial businesses. So you get so much exposure to different ways that people lead and influence and it diversifies your perspective."

Serving on a board outside of her workplace and working with a group on making a difference in the community is important to her.

“I do hope the chamber will shape this community,” she said.

Altman focuses on what people want Midlothian to be and also hold onto what makes Midlothian unique.

“It’s not something a city can hand deliver with tax dollars; it’s not something necessarily a school district can deliver. But a bunch of diverse business leaders could say, ‘Yeah, we want to make that happen.’,” Altman said enthusiastically.

 

Ashley Ford | Facebook | Twitter | 469-517-1450